Michigan Legislation covered at Getting to the Goal conference

The 2016 Getting to the Goal conference will offer a session on Michigan legislation. Register Now

Several important bills have been introduced into the state legislature with the potential to improve animal welfare. This session will provide overview of each bill, the current status and what you can do. Updates will include Breed Specific Legislation (SB 239), Logan’s law: animal abuse background checking (HB 4353 & 4355, SB 219 & 220), Stray Hold (HB4915), No-Kill Shelter License Plate (HB5349), Regulations for Large-scale Dog Breeders (HB4898) and Shelter Gassing Ban (SB403).

Richard Angelo, Best Friends Animal Society; Courtney Protz-Sanders, MiPACA; Pam Sordyl, Puppy Mill Awareness of SE Michigan

Meet the presenters:

Richard Angelo

Richard Angelo, Jr.

Richard Angelo, Jr. is a Legislative Attorney for Best Friends Animal Society. His focus is on Best Friends’ Community Cat Initiatives and promoting legislation that will humanely and directly reduce the killing of cats in shelters across the country. He was previously a sole practitioner with an office in Davison, MI, focusing on companion animal-related matters and litigation. Richard has been a member of the Animal Law Section of the State Bar of Michigan and has served as a council member of that Section since 2009. He is also a member of the National Animal Care and Control Association, American Bar Association, TIPS-Animal Law Committee, and a vice-chair of the newly formed International Law Section, Animal Law Committee. In addition to his work for Best Friends, Richard also volunteers at his local animal control shelter, and several other animal welfare organizations in Michigan. Richard resides in Goodrich, MI with his wife, four dogs, and three cats.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Courtney Protz-Sanders and Bubba

Courtney Protz-Sanders and Bubba

Courtney Protz-Sanders began her career in animal welfare in 2000 at the Dumb Friends League, the largest open admission animal shelter in the Rocky Mountains. With more than 16 years of experience in animal welfare, Protz-Sanders has led or participated in numerous projects, coalitions and organizations, including the committee to reform Detroit Animal Control, the Michigan Pet Fund Alliance Rescue Certification Task Force and the National Disaster Animal Response Team. From wildfires to hurricanes, and from animal hoarding to dog fighting, Protz-Sanders is skilled in triage and emergency sheltering for animals. In 2014, Protz-Sanders was a professional speaker at the largest international animal welfare conference, the HSUS Expo. Protz-Sanders was also a presenter at three past Michigan No Kill conferences. In 2005, Protz-Sanders founded Paws for Life Rescue, a non-profit, foster-based, all-breed rescue for dogs and cats. She continues today as Board president and executive director. Protz-Sanders also currently serves as a founding member, Board trustee and spokesperson for Michigan’s Political Action Committee for Animals (Mi-PACA). In 2014, Protz-Sanders helped develop and launch Make Michigan Next, a coalition of advocates working to end breed discrimination in Michigan, and also served as the rally emcee at the state Capitol in September of that year.

 

 

 

Pam Sordyl

Pam Sordyl

Pamela Sordyl started advocating for animals in 2007 when she learned about puppy mills and factory farming. It didn’t take her long to find an active local group, like Southeast Michigan Animal Rights Team (S.M.A.R.T), to start protesting Petland, the world’s largest puppy retailer. Protesting turned into leading public education campaigns and the formation of Puppy Mill Awareness of SE Michigan. Last year, she worked to form a coalition called Michigan Friends of Companion Animals to focus on pending state legislation (HB 4898), the Large-scale Commercial Dog Breeder Act and local ordinances that would prohibit the retail sale of dogs, cats, rabbits, ferrets, long lived birds and large reptiles. It is her hope that one day animal exploitation will be only found in history books.

 

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Organizational Transparency and Understanding Your Numbers

When did you last think about your organization’s operations in terms of transparency and data analysis? Suited for rescue and shelter staff, policy makers, volunteers, and the general public, either or both of these sessions will inspire you with new ideas and ways to make your organization even better than it already is.

AttenRegister Nowd these sessions at the 2016 Getting to the Goal conference.

Transparency and Accountability – What does the word “transparency” mean for a shelter or a rescue organization? How transparent is your operation? Does everyone know the conditions or criteria that would result in euthanasia? Do you post all of your performance results? Are your financials available for public inspection? Transparency and accountability help build trust with your supporters, contributors and taxpayers. Listen as a panel of speakers from a shelter, rescue and not for profit explain how they define transparency for their organization. Cheryl Gault, Michigan Pet Fund Alliance; Tawny Hammond, Austin Animal Services; Courtney Protz-Sanders, Paws for Life Rescue

Why the numbers count – Every shelter is required to collect information on the intake and disposition of the animals that come into their facilities. If the only time those numbers are used is to provide an annual accounting to the state, a valuable resource is being lost. Understanding your intake, common conditions, length of stay, etc. helps to identify programs to reduce intake, serve the community and measure success. Learn how the Humane Society of Huron Valley uses their numbers to improve their operations and provide animal welfare programs for the dogs and cats of Washtenaw County. Tanya Hilgendorf , Humane Society of Huron Valley

Meet the presenters:

Cheryl Gault

Cheryl Gault

 

Cheryl Gault is a founding member of the Michigan Pet Fund Alliance and has served as Treasurer since inception of the organization in 2003.  Cheryl’s career background was in commercial lending having work as consultant, Vice President and loan officer for several financial institutions and directed Oakland County’s financial services for economic development including administration of the federal SBA program for the county.  Cheryl has been a dog Mom to various rescue canine companions over the years.  Her current four-legged children include a rescue and a foster that became a full time family member 6 years ago.

 

 

 

 

Tawny Hammond with Judy

Tawny Hammond with Judy

 

Tawny Hammond, Chief of Animal Services for the City of Austin Texas, has spent the last 29 years working in the public service arena, creating and implementing programs and services for people and their animals. For five years, Austin Animal Services has been a leader for municipal shelters in the nation, saving more than 90% of the more than 18,000 animals that come through the doors each year. Austin is the largest No Kill city in the nation. Chief Hammond has a proven track record of success, serving for more than 25 years in municipal government in Fairfax County, Virginia and bringing the Fairfax County Animal Shelter to No Kill in less than three years. Austin reached a new milestone, achieving live outcomes for nearly 95% of the more than 18,000 animals who came through its doors this past year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tanya Hilgendorf  with Georgia

Tanya Hilgendorf with Georgia

 

Tanya Hilgendorf  has been leading HSHV for over 10 years. With a BA in Political Science from University of Michigan-Dearborn and a Masters in Social Work Administration and Public Policy from Wayne State University and having served as Executive Director of Ozone House, her passion centers on protecting the vulnerable (human and non-human animals) and transformational leadership that helps failing nonprofit organizations achieve mission success. With an incredible team of staff, volunteers, and supporters, HSHV built a state of the art facility and has become a thriving, dynamic animal welfare organization with a multi-service organization, with 100+ employees, 700+ volunteers, and a 95% save rate focused on rescuing, healing, saving and protecting. Tanya currently is the proud mom of several fabulous felines and a beautiful teenaged human.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Courtney Protz-Sanders and Bubba

Courtney Protz-Sanders and Bubba

Courtney Protz-Sanders began her career in animal welfare in 2000 at the Dumb Friends League, the largest open admission animal shelter in the Rocky Mountains. With more than 16 years of experience in animal welfare, Protz-Sanders has led or participated in numerous projects, coalitions and organizations, including the committee to reform Detroit Animal Control, the Michigan Pet Fund Alliance Rescue Certification Task Force and the National Disaster Animal Response Team. From wildfires to hurricanes, and from animal hoarding to dog fighting, Protz-Sanders is skilled in triage and emergency sheltering for animals. In 2014, Protz-Sanders was a professional speaker at the largest international animal welfare conference, the HSUS Expo. Protz-Sanders was also a presenter at three past Michigan No Kill conferences. In 2005, Protz-Sanders founded Paws for Life Rescue, a non-profit, foster-based, all-breed rescue for dogs and cats. She continues today as Board president and executive director. Protz-Sanders also currently serves as a founding member, Board trustee and spokesperson for Michigan’s Political Action Committee for Animals (Mi-PACA). In 2014, Protz-Sanders helped develop and launch Make Michigan Next, a coalition of advocates working to end breed discrimination in Michigan, and also served as the rally \ emcee at the state Capitol in September of that year.

 

For more information about the conference, to become an exhibitor or sponsor, or to register, click here.

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Best Practices for Rescues – How do you measure up?

Michigan is home to hundreds of private animal rescue groups. Most want to do the best they can for the animals they serve. Why reinvent the wheel in terms of identifying procedures, documenting policies, and developing programs?    AttenRegister Nowd this session at the 2016 Getting to the Goal conference.

Best Practices for Rescues – How Do You Measure Up? Home-based rescue organizations serve a tremendous need – especially those that collaborate with shelters to solve or remedy challenges with animals’ health or behavior issues. It is important each rescue organization operate using best practices for the animals’ well-being, as well as sound business practices. Join Jaime Wolfe from NBS Animal Rescue as she leads a panel discussion of several Michigan Pet Fund Alliance Certified home-based rescue organizations as they discuss the advantages and challenges of certification including grants for animals pulled from shelters with health or behavior issues or over the age of 7, participation in the Michigan SECC (charitable giving program for state employees), changing operations to focus only on Michigan animals, etc. Missi Bellottie, Detroit Bully Crew; Nicole Fear, Canine Companions Rescue; Jillian Kane, Furever Tails Animal Rescue; Jaime Wolfe, NBS  Animal Rescue

Meet the presenters:

Missi Belottie

Missi Belottie

 

Missi Bellottie started rescuing canines in 2008.  She moved to Lapeer MI from South Texas in 2011. In Texas, her husband Bill Bellottie operated a rescue for canines and farm animals such as horses and cattle.  Upon arrival in Michigan in February of 2011, they planned to take a “break” from rescue.  That didn’t last long as they saw a tremendous need for their experience in Detroit.  In March of 2011 they  became Detroit Bully Corps  and in 2016 became a certified shelter with the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Development and a Certified Rescue with Michigan Pet Fund Alliance.

Nicole Fear

Nicole Fear

 

Nicole Fear began fostering for Canine Companions Rescue Center (CCRC) in 2009 and specializes in harder to place and senior dogs. She worked closely with CCRC’s manager to change intake policies to concentrate on local Michigan shelters and dogs with medical needs. She is an active animal advocate and currently works for Warren Animal Control.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jill Kane

Jill Kane

Jillian (Jill) Kane is a founding director of Furever Tails Animal Rescue, a foster-based, no-kill 501c3 canine and feline rescue. She has been prominent in the rescue community since 2012.  She has always had a love for animals. In  Dryden, where she graduated high school, she participated in the local 4-H programs and raised chickens, ducks, rabbits pigs, goats. Jill has a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science but her passion has always been for helping animals. She currently resides in Oakland Township with her husband and sons in a large ranch home on 5 acres. She has taken part in rescuing more than 300 lives in only a few years. Her compassion and patience speak true for those whose voices cannot be heard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jaime Wolfe

Jaime Wolfe

Jaime Wolfe is the Co-Founder of NBS Animal Rescue, a Five Star Certified Rescue.  She is also the Certification Coordinator for the Michigan Pet Fund Alliance’s Rescue Certification Program that was launched in 2012.  Jaime devotes her time and energy to NBS Animal Rescue finding shelter animals who are high risk, fostering, screening adopters, and doing home visits.  Her heart is with senior dogs and those needing extra medical help.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Stories of Change & No Kill Michigan – Progress We Have Made!

Looking for inspiration as to how shelter improvements can be made? Are No Kill programs really working? What changes can a poorly-performing shelter make to save more lives?  AttenRegister Nowd these sessions at the 2016 Getting to the Goal conference.

 

Stories of change – Three large Michigan shelters have had dramatic turnarounds in the last two years. Listen to their stories, as presented by their directors. Learn what led up to the change, the challenges they face, and their vision for the future for their shelters.  Paul Wallace, Genesee County Animal Control; Melissa Miller, Detroit Animal Care & Control; Ken Kempkens, Humane Society of Macomb 

No Kill Michigan: Progress We Have Made (Opening Session, 9 a.m. Friday) – The 1st Michigan No Kill Conference was 2011. Several years prior to the conference, Otsego County Animal Shelter was Michigan’s first county to adopt a millage, develop a collaborative public/private partnership and become no-kill saving 90% or more of the animals in their care. Shortly after Otsego’s live-saving measures, UPAWS in Marquette was teetering on the brink of closing due to financial issues. Their board decided they had NOTHING TO LOSE, they read together Nathan Winograd’s book Redemption: The No Kill Revolution in America and decided to implement the programs he said were possible – and almost immediately they were saving over 90% of the animals in their care. In 2014, 40% of Michigan’s Counties were no-kill. So what do the 2015 numbers tell us?  Deborah Schutt, Michigan Pet Fund Alliance

Meet the presenters:

Ken Kempkens and Rico

Ken Kempkens and Rico

Kenneth Kempkens has 39 years in various management and sales positions in the graphic arts industry, during which time he met and developed a great relationship with Mr. George Fox at the Humane Society of Macomb.  Ken was asked to join the Board of Directors when Mr. Fox passed away and eventually was elected to fill his seat on the Board. In 2014 he was elected to the Board of Directors as its President. In his 2nd year as President he assumed a more hands-on approach to the day-to-day operations of the shelter. Ken oversaw the introduction of many new and exciting programs and worked directly with the Director to make some positive changes and helped to move the Humane Society of Macomb from a high kill shelter to its current situation as a no kill shelter.  In the past 12 months Ken is proud to say that through teamwork and a great crew they have accomplished the necessary steps to boast a 95% save rate. Ken intends to make sure that, using Best Practices, this trend will continue into the future. Ken has been married to his wife Josie for 43 years. They have two sons and three grandchildren. They have adopted numerous shelter animals and now live in Clinton Township with their lab/pit Roxie. She rules the house.

 

 

 

 

Melissa Miller

Melissa Miller

Melissa Miller is Director of Detroit Animal Care and Control.  She is a former Shelter Operations Manager and sheltering consultant for the Humane Society of the United States Animal Rescue Team, as well as co-founder of Dog Aide, a non-profit devoted to shelter intervention and owner retention.  Melissa holds Certified Behavior Consultant Canine (CBCC-KA) and Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT-KA) certifications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Debbie Schutt and Cassie

Debbie Schutt and Cassie

Deborah Schutt is chair and one of the founders of the Michigan Pet Fund Alliance.  She is an urban planner by profession.  After 21 years working for the public sector, she established her own consulting firm 19 years ago, working out of her home, which allowed her to volunteer as a foster parent for puppies. As she became more familiar and more involved with animal welfare, Deborah became acutely aware of the lack of planning, collaboration and use of systematic approaches, which were successfully used in other areas of her profession, to solve and address problems and issues in animal welfare. She became convinced that animal homelessness in Michigan could be solved, including saving the more than 100,000 animals annually euthanized in shelters, if a different approach was taken. Since the Michigan Pet Fund Alliance has been providing information on best practices and supporting advocacy, Michigan shelters have reduced the number of animals euthanized annually in shelters to 37,000.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Wallace

Paul Wallace

Paul Wallace took the reins as Director of Genesee County Animal Control in January 2015 with his work cut out for him.  The good news was the county had recently approve a millage to support the shelter.  The challenging news was the shelter was the subject of public controversy with high kill rates, locked doors, shut out volunteers and what some felt were secretive operations.  Paul’s three decades of law enforcement experience for Genesee County and the city of Clio as – patrolmen, detective, and commander – provided many of the skill sets needed for the challenge.  As a respected community leader with long-standing associations and respect, political confidence increased delivering the support needed to institute many of the transformations at the municipal shelter.  Paul will be the first to tell you there is still a lot to be done.  Paul’s love of animals began during his childhood growing up across the street from a farm that provided him the hands-on opportunities of caring for horses, cows, chickens, etc., and of course having his own furry pals through-out the years.

a time when the future of Animal Control is being shaped to the benefit of the public, the animals, the volunteers and the staff.  Ask Amy about her travels with Sully.

For more information about the conference, to become an exhibitor or sponsor, or to register, click here.

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Canine Play Groups & Minimizing Shelter Illness

Although open to everyone, shelter staff and volunteers in particular will be interested in these sessions at the 2016 Getting to the Goal conference.Register Now

Canine Play Groups – Play groups are a powerful tool for shelters to increase adoptions, provide enrichment and improve animals’ quality of life. Dogs who participate in play groups are much easier to adopt! For one thing, they have better kennel presentation because they are well exercised and more satisfied. But, how do you start one and what do you need to know to make sure you do it right? When Macomb County started using play groups, they prepared for the worst but found their concerns were unfounded. They have now shared their experience with Genesee County. Lisa Rabine and Amy Warner

How to minimize shelter illness and maximize shelter health – Welcome to 21st century sheltering! There are countless decisions that are made daily within a shelter that will contribute to the animals’ health and well-being. From the moment of intake to daily routine – each standard procedure can affect the animal’s health. When are vaccinations given? How are cages cleaned and with what? What is the cage size and where are they placed? What is an acceptable noise level? How much enrichment should be provided daily and what should it be? What is your capacity for humane care? Learn how well you are doing or where you might find change is needed. Dr. Jeff Fortna, DVM

Meet the presenters:

Jeff FortnaDr. Jeff Fortna graduated from veterinary school at Michigan State University in 2000.  As a newly minted veterinarian, he began his career in small animal private practice.  After five years in this traditional role, he branched out into other areas of meaningful veterinary work—teaching veterinary technician students and providing relief services at a municipal shelter.  Shortly thereafter, he accepted a permanent position with the municipal shelter where he learned about the successes and challenges of shelter practice.  Over his tenure working in shelter medicine, he has garnered a profound appreciation for the art and science that rests within this burgeoning field.  Dr. Fortna has endeavored to stay at the leading edge of this new discipline by completing the Maddie’s Graduate Certificate in Shelter Medicine.  He has gone on to become one of the first graduates to receive a master’s degree in shelter medicine at the University of Florida.  This training has broadened his knowledge and skills in shelter medicine, veterinary forensics, and public health.  His areas of professional interest include protocol development for animal shelters, disease outbreak management, public health and zoonotic diseases, and surgical proficiency in high volume caseloads.  Outside of work, one will find “Dr. Jeff” marathon training, drinking coffee, or being trained by his shelter rescue dog, Beans.

 

Lisa Rabine and Lucas

Lisa Rabine and Lucas

Lisa Rabine  is currently a Canine Trainer and Administrative Assistant for Macomb County Animal Control and Vice President on the Board and Lead Program Facilitator for Teacher’s Pet: Dogs and Kids Learning Together.  She has been with Teacher’s Pet ever since she started training dogs 10 years ago and started volunteering for MCAC while running a Teacher’s Pet Program at the Macomb County Juvenile Justice Center.  She volunteered for MCAC for five years before being hired three years ago and has been heavily involved in reforming the shelter under Chief Randazzo. One of the programs she implemented at MCAC is the Dogs Play For Life canine play group program.  Since starting this program over a year ago, there has been a major difference in the dogs’ behavior in the shelter.  MCAC has shared this program with several other Michigan shelters and Lisa is very excited to keep sharing!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amy Warner

Amy Warner

Amy Warner has found that her BBA in Marketing and Business Management has been a valuable tool in effectively raising funds and educating the public in responsible pet ownership.  Through her involvement with numerous rescues and organizations over the years, she has been instrumental in re-homing efforts and animal care and welfare.  She currently is the Volunteer Coordinator for Genesee County Animal Control and is very excited about coming in at a time when the future of Animal Control is being shaped to the benefit of the public, the animals, the volunteers and the staff.  Ask Amy about her travels with Sully.

 

 

 

For more information about the conference, to become an exhibitor or sponsor, or to register, click here.

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Special Conference Sessions: TNR (Trap-Neuter-Return)

All About Animals Rescue AAARHave you been wanting to learn more about TNR (Trap-Neuter-Return) but haven’t found a class conveniently scheduled to your location or availability? Now is your chance.

Whether you’re registering for the full Getting to the Goal conference, or just want to stop in for a NO CHARGE  TNR session, you are invited to join us in Flint on Thursday 9/15/16 from 9:30 – noon. We are pleased to offer a class conducted by staff from All About Animals Rescue, who will teach and empower you to start TNRing the cats in your area with their 2.5 hour workshop. Once you have taken the class you are entitled to major spay/neuter discounts for all ferals: $25 each, which includes sterilization, mandatory ear tip, and a rabies vaccine (rabies vaccine for cats 12 weeks and older). This workshop teaches the best practices in management and trapping. Gain access to the benefits of AAAR’s TNR program, including the discounted feral cat spay/neuter, trap loans and networking. A $10 optional TNR handbook is available on site.

Meet the presenter:

Catherine Garrett

Catherine Garrett

 

Catherine Garrett is the Director of Development and Marketing at All About Animals Rescue.  An advocate for feral cats for over 16 years, she heads the Trap Neuter Return program at the organization. Her first hands-on experience with community cats was TNRing in Tokyo, where she learned how critical spay/neuter is to bettering the lives of our feral friends. Over 3,000 caretakers have come through the AAAR TNR training and nearly 20,000 community cats have been sterilized in the past 5 years, a good portion under Catherine’s leadership.

For more information about the conference, to become an exhibitor or sponsor, or to register, click here.

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Million Cat Challenge at 2016 Getting to the Goal Conference

Million Cat Challenge

 

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The Million Cat Challenge and its five key initiatives will be session options at the 2016 Getting to the Goal conference.

The sessions include:

Million Cat Challenge Overview – The Million Cat Challenge is a shelter-based campaign to save the lives of one million cats in North America over the next five years. The core strategy of the campaign focuses on five key initiatives that offer every shelter, in every community, practical choices to reduce euthanasia and to increase live outcomes for shelter cats. This life-saving campaign is a joint project of the UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program and the Maddie’s Shelter Medicine Program at the University of Florida, led by Drs. Kate Hurley and Julie Levy. Christie Keith, Million Cat Challenge; Dr. Julie Levy, Maddie’s Shelter Medicine at the University of Florida

Million Cat Challenge: Alternatives to Intake – Is entering an animal shelter always the best option for a cat? There will always be cats who need sheltering, but for many cats, there are better, more appropriate alternatives that will serve cat, community, and shelter better. And if the answer is no, shelters have an ample and expanding toolbox of alternatives to offer. Providing alternatives to intake can be a great choice for shelters that are limited in their capacity to provide humane care or assure live outcomes once a cat is admitted. In most parts of North America, there is no legal requirement for shelters to impound every healthy cat presented to them. By providing alternatives to intake for healthy cats, shelters with limited capacity can reserve theYear of the Catir efforts for the sick, injured, orphaned and dangerous animals that most need the shelter’s care.  Dr. Julie Levy, Maddie’s Shelter Medicine at the University of Florida; Ayse Dunlap, Cleveland Animal Protective League

Million Cat Challenge: Managed Admission – Managed admission is distinct from limited admission and refers to any form of regulating or scheduling intake, from simply limiting the hours for drop-off and closing night drop boxes, to scheduled intake appointments, to a formal process of surrender interviews with extensive efforts at providing support and alternatives. In short, managed admission can be thought of as the “how” and “when” of intake, but not necessarily the “who.”

Even shelters with an obligation to take in all animals presented to them (either by law, contract or policy) can benefit greatly from scheduling intake to smooth out fluctuations, plan for staffing and match capacity to provide humane care. Far from meaning more animals will be turned away, for both limited- and open-intake shelters managed admission is often associated with serving more, rather than fewer, animals over time. Dr. Julie Levy, Maddie’s Shelter Medicine at the University of Florida; Ayse Dunlap, Cleveland Animal Protective League

Million Cat Challenge: Capacity for Care – Capacity for care (C4C), considered holistically, means meeting the needs of each cat admitted to a shelter, whether feral or friendly, stray or owner surrendered, young or old. The Five Freedoms of Animal Welfare provide a framework to define what it means to meet the needs of any animal in confinement. Assuring capacity for care also supports success in meeting a Sixth Freedom, the freedom from euthanasia for cats that are neither terminally ill nor dangerous. Providing high quality housing and minimizing length of stay through pro- active management are two key factors in assuring capacity for care for every cat in the shelter. Dr. Julie Levy, Maddie’s Shelter Medicine at the University of Florida; Tanya Hilgendorf, Humane Society of Huron Valley

Million Cat Challenge: Removing Barriers to Adoption – In most communities, we simply can’t afford to provide unlimited care for every cat who is temporarily without a home, or find a traditionally defined “perfect forever home” for every cat, of every temperament and in any condition, who might appear on a shelter’s doorstep. It’s the job of shelters to prepare cats for adoption and then move them out as quickly as possible into permanent homes. In many cases, the quality of life in a home, even an imperfect one, is better than a cat’s experience in a shelter.  Susan Cosby, Petco Foundation; Dr. Julie Levy, Maddie’s Shelter Medicine at the University of Florida

Million Cat Challenge: Return to Field – In traditional trap-neuter-return (TNR) programs, community cats are trapped and transported directly to a spay/neuter clinic, where they are sterilized, vaccinated, and ear-tipped for identification. Following recovery, the cats are returned to the location where they were trapped to live out their lives without producing any more kittens. TNR programs have been shown to decrease colony size through attrition, and even to eliminate colonies entirely in some cases. Recently, growing popularity of Return To Field (RTF) programs stems from the recognition that neuter-return is appropriate for most healthy unowned cats that are thriving in the community, regardless of whether they have entered a shelter. A combination of both community-based traditional TNR and shelter-based RTF creates the greatest opportunity to maximize cat welfare, reduce nuisance concerns, and minimize reproduction. Dr. Julie Levy, Maddie’s Shelter Medicine at the University of Florida; Dr. Diana Newman, Michigan Pet Fund Alliance; Renee Jarackas, All About Animals Rescue; Amy Wettlaufer, All About Animals Rescue

Meet the presenters:

Susan Cosby

Susan Cosby

Susan Cosby serves as the Petco Foundation’s Director of Lifesaving Programs and Partnerships overseeing the alignment and forward progress of both the adoption and investment (grants) programs. Prior to joining the Foundation her experience included CEO, Executive Director and other leadership roles for both open and limited admission, public animal control and private shelters. Throughout her career she has utilized customer focused, data driven strategies, and a sense of urgency to improve organizational performance and increase lives saved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ayse Dunlap

Ayse Dunlap

Ayse Dunlap has worked in animal welfare for 18 years and joined the Cleveland APL in 2006.   Prior to her time in Cleveland, she worked at Chicago’s Animal Care and Control, PAWS Chicago, and the Animal Humane Association in New Mexico.  At the Cleveland APL, Ayse oversees operations including the admissions, adoptions, shelter wellness, veterinary, humane investigations, and TNR programs that assist more than 14,000 animals annually.  She also oversees the APL’s newest program, project CARE (Community Animal Retention Effort), which is focused on creating proactive initiatives to help keep pets in their homes. Ayse currently has one dog and three cats.  All three cats were foster failures.  Maybe one day she’ll learn not to foster cats.

 

 

 

 

Tanya Hilgendorf  with Georgia

Tanya Hilgendorf with Georgia

Tanya Hilgendorf  has been leading HSHV for over 10 years. With a BA in Political Science from University of Michigan-Dearborn and a Masters in Social Work Administration and Public Policy from Wayne State University and having served as Executive Director of Ozone House, her passion centers on protecting the vulnerable (human and non-human animals) and transformational leadership that helps failing nonprofit organizations achieve mission success. With an incredible team of staff, volunteers, and supporters, HSHV built a state of the art facility and has become a thriving, dynamic animal welfare organization with a multi-service organization, with 100+ employees, 700+ volunteers, and a 95% save rate focused on rescuing, healing, saving and protecting. Tanya currently is the proud mom of several fabulous felines and a beautiful teenaged human.

Renee Jarackas

Renee Jarackas

Renee Jarackas has been in the veterinary field since 1986 and has extensive husbandry experience caring for horses and chickens. She also spent several years as a wildlife rehabber for waterfowl. Her passion for animals led her to join All About Animals Rescue in 2012. She is currently the Clinic Director of the organization and is helping pave the way for the non-profit to expand its sterilization capacity and reach.  All About Animals Rescue Clinic currently performs over 20,000 spay/neuter procedures a year.

 

 

 

 

Christie Keith and Lita

Christie Keith and Lita

Christie Keith is a communications and social media consultant for a number of animal welfare and veterinary clients, including The Shelter Pet Project, Maddie’s Fund, the Million Cat Challenge, the Maddie’s Shelter Medicine Program at the University of Florida and Dr. Marty Becker of “Good Morning America” and “The Dr. Oz Show.” She is a frequent speaker at animal welfare and pet writer conferences, and is a member of the advisory board of the Michigan Pet Fund Alliance in her adopted state of Michigan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Julie Levy

Dr. Julie Levy

Dr. Julie Levy  is professor of shelter medicine at the University of Florida. She is a specialist in small animal internal medicine and has published more than 100 scientific papers on the health and welfare of animals in shelters, feline infectious diseases, humane alternatives for cat population control, and contraceptive vaccines for cats. She founded Operation Catnip, a university-based community cat trap-neuter-return program that has sterilized more than 45,000 cats since 1998.  In 2014, she joined Dr. Kate Hurley to launch the Million Cat Challenge, a shelter-based campaign to save a million cats in five years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diana Newman and Parker

Diana Newman and Parker

Dr. Diana Newman has been involved in animal welfare for many years.  Although her work situations have varied, her dedication to animals has remained the same.  Dr. Newman practiced dental hygiene, served as assistant director of a low cost OB/GYN and Pediatric clinic, and for the last 15 years of her career worked at Western Michigan University as a program manager for grants from the State of Michigan and the National Science Foundation.  After retirement, she became the Director of the Barry County Animal Shelter where she developed a comprehensive TNR program for the County and transformed the shelter’s performance. Dr. Newman lives in Battle Creek, MI with her husband, two dogs and four cats, and usually several bottle baby kittens and fosters.  Her two children, their spouses and five grandchildren live near-by and are always in awe of the “zoo” as they call it.

 

 

 

 

Amy Wettlaufer

Amy Wettlaufer

Amy Wettlaufer – In her role as Program Manager with All About Animals Rescue, Amy Wettlaufer manages an active Community Cats program, which includes partnerships with the Macomb County Animal Shelter and the City of Warren. Before joining All About Animals Rescue in 2013, Amy managed community outreach, adoption and low-cost spay/neuter programs for the Michigan Animal Rescue League in Pontiac. She has a life-long affection for animals and a commitment to a life of service in animal welfare. Amy happily shares her home with her two elderbulls, Emma and Jake, but also regularly welcomes feline and canine fosters.

 

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ACO-related sessions at Getting to the Goal Conference

Any conference attendee will benefit from the following, but in particular, Animal Control Officers will want to take part in tthese sessions:

ACO Certification – Is it time to up the requirements?  –To become a certified Animal Control Officer in Michigan, a person must first complete the required 100 hours of training /field work, such as a day shadowing a current officer, a day with a veterinarian, a half day with the local authority, county commissioner, or city manager discussing local policies and procedures, and a day spent with the sheriff or police chief discussing laws, enforcement policies, how to issue a summons, serving of warrants, and public relations. Once training is complete a summary of activities is submitted to the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development for certification approval. Substantial change and complications have occurred in animal welfare since these standards were established. Hear three Animal Control experts give their perspective and launch the dialogue for change. Becky Neal, Michigan Association of Animal Control Officers; Matthew Pepper, Michigan Humane Society; Jeff Randazzo, Macomb County Animal Control

Changing Animal Control Practices from Punitive to Positive – Your animal control program can be more successful by implementing positive, rather than punitive, practices in your community. Community engagement leads to fewer cruelty complaints and impounds, and more positive experiences in the field. Learn which law enforcement organizations to partner with, the benefits of using deferments over citations, how to educate owners for long-term success and how to keep animals that are not shelter adoption candidates in homes where they were successful. Karen Sparapani, Milwaukee Area Domestic Animal Control Commission

Meet the presenters:

Becky Neal

Becky Neal

Becky Neal – Becky Neal is currently the President of the Michigan Association of Animal Control Officers, sits on the Small Animal Companion Board, MI-SART Board, and active as a legislative representative for MAACO.   Becky has been employed by Eaton County Animal Control as an ACO for the past 20 years.  She is a graduate of Michigan State University, where she attended the Horse Management program.  Becky was previously employed at a veterinary clinic as an exam room technician for 5 years prior to becoming an ACO.  She lives on the family farm where she raises Hereford cattle with her husband and two boys.

 

 

 

 

 

Matt Pepper

Matt Pepper

Matthew Pepper – Matt Pepper joined the Michigan Humane Society (MHS) as its President and CEO in August 2014.  He came to MHS with more than 15 years of animal welfare experience including leadership roles in animal care and control in New Mexico, Tennessee, and Louisiana. He began his career in Michigan working both with Kent County Animal Control and the Humane Society of West Michigan. He holds a B.S. in wildlife biology from Grand Valley State University and has taught law enforcement and animal care and control professionals in four states – primarily on complex animal cruelty investigations and related topics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeff Randazzo

Jeff Randazzo

Jeff Randazzo – Jeff Randazzo currently serves as the Chief Animal Control officer for Macomb County.  He is the recipient of the 2014 Michigan Pet Fund Alliance Award for Innovations & Best Practices – Creating Transformational Change.   Jeff attended Michigan State University where he studied Equine Science & Livestock Management which prepared him for his employment with the City of Detroit as a horse trainer and instructor for the Detroit Mounted Police. For the last decade Jeff’s professional career has concentrated in various aspects of welfare for homeless cats and dogs from animal evaluator, adoption counselor, to veterinary and surgical assistant, to animal control for both municipal and not for profits shelters. Jeff takes a “problem solving” approach to animal control.  Under his direction Macomb was the first in the state to institute higher professional standards for Animal Control Officers; a shelter, neuter, release program for community cats and dog play groups.

 

 

Karen Sparapani and Jake

Karen Sparapani and Jake

Karen Sparapani – Karen Sparapani is the Executive Director of Milwaukee Area Domestic Animal Control Commission (MADACC). MADACC is the sole animal control provider for the 19 municipalities of Milwaukee County taking in 11,000 animals per year. She is a member of the Milwaukee Animal Cruelty Task Force, the Milwaukee County Hoarding Task Force, and is part of a coalition of progressive Wisconsin shelter leaders who recently worked to successfully make important and lifesaving changes to Wisconsin State Statute 173. She recently appeared in a Discovery Channel special discussing the dangers of the private ownership of exotic animals and has presented extensively on evolving animal control practices.

 

 

 

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Breed Labeling: What’s New in 2016

Breed labeling is a hot topic. We know by now that it is often inaccurate, and that a breed label assigned to a dog may impact its potential for a successful adoption. A session at Michigan Pet Fund Alliance’s “Getting to the Goal” Conference in Flint, Mich., on Sept. 15-16, 2016 will  focus on breed labels presented by Tawny Hammond, Director of Animal Services for the City of Austin, TX.

Join us for:

Screen Shot 2016-07-06 at 8.52.55 AMBreed Labels and Language – The dog comes in the door, has a kind of a square head, not real muscular but… we think it is a pit bull.  So what is on the intake card for breed – pit bull?  We have come a long way in busting the myths of breed discrimination, but there is a lot of misinformation and education to be done and by simply marking “pit bull”  you have eliminated adopters from some communities, put a potential adopter in jeopardy of losing their home insurance, and limited the number of potential adopters. We certainly can’t perform DNA tests on all incoming shelter dogs, but there are things that every shelter can and should be doing concerning identifying the breed of dog on intake.Pasted Graphic

Meet the presenter:

Tawny Hammond

Tawny Hammond and Judy

Tawny Hammond and Judy

Tawny Hammond, the Chief of Animal Services for the City of Austin, Texas, has spent the last 29 years working in the public service arena, creating and implementing programs and services for people and their animals. For five years, Austin Animal Services has been a leader for municipal shelters in the nation, saving more than 90% of the more than 18,000 animals that come through the doors each year. Austin is the largest No Kill city in the nation.

Austin Animal Center

Chief Hammond has a proven track record of success, serving for more than 25 years in municipal government in Fairfax County, Virginia and bringing the Fairfax County Animal Shelter to No Kill in less than three years. Austin reached a new milestone, achieving live outcomes for nearly 95% of the more than 18,000 animals who came through its doors this past year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Understanding canine behavior has numerous benefits

Have you dealt with shy, fearful, aggressive, or reactive dogs? Has it affected their adoptability, resulting in returns or worse?  Three sessions at Michigan Pet Fund Alliance’s “Getting to the Goal” Conference in Flint, Mich., on Sept. 15-16, 2016 will be focused on canine behavior, presented by Jane Wolff and Kate Wilson of Cascades Humane Society and Katelin Thomas of K9 Turbo Training.

The sessions are:

Improving Potential for Successful Adoptions – Understanding Canine Body Language The more your staff, volunteers and fosters know about how to read and interpret dog body language, the more effective they can be in helping a dog overcome a behavior issue. This two-hour session focuses on learning to recognize and interpret negotiation signals; calming and cut off signals; the language of play; predation and prey drive; conflict and escalating signals; and stress, fear and anxiety.  Kate Wilson and Jane Wolff

Humane Behavioral and Handling Tips for Shy and Fearful Dogs  When faced with apprehending a fearful or fear aggressive dog, it is often human nature or habit to react with a brute physical force. Often the result is the dog struggling or fighting back, which can result in harm to both the dog and handler. Most dogs do not want a struggle or even a conflict. This session will focus on the use of your best skills and attitudes, along with new tools and techniques. Learn a variety of tools and techniques for catching dogs by hand in a safe, humane, and efficient manner; compassionate physical restraint including scruff, lateral restraint, leash muzzle wrap and hobbles without adding energy to any struggle; recognize how you, the handler, is raising or lowering the tension of the dog and the situation; and explore how to create a calm conscious manner to minimize the energy of conflict, even with very uncooperative dogs. Kate Wilson, Katelin Thomas

Improving Potential for Successful Adoptions – Understanding Aggression & Reactivity  When a dog responds in an abnormal way or overreacts to a certain stimulus (known as a ‘trigger’), we sometimes refer to them as being reactive. Some common behaviors that you may see in a dog displaying reactivity include barking (or other vocalizations such as whining), growling, or lunging. Reactivity can develop for various reasons but generally stems from fear, frustration, or aggression. This two-hour session discusses the basics of reactivity and aggression in dogs, what it is and how to safely and effectively modify it. The session will specifically focus on assisting shelters and the rescue community in making dogs more adoptable and training these dogs in a way that increases adoptability and reliability.  Katelin Thomas, Kate Wilson, and Jane Wolff

Meet the presenters:

Katelin Thomas
Katelin Thomas

Katelin Thomas

Katelin Thomas is the owner of K9 Turbo Training, a company based in Metro Detroit that assists owners, rescues, and shelters with their more “difficult” dogs.  Katelin offers in-home behavior modification and training for owned animals, as well as volunteer and staff training to rescues and shelters in order to ensure that adoptable dogs get only the best and most up-to-date training available.

Katelin is an Associate Certified Dog Behavior Consultant through the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants as well as a Certified Professional Dog Trainer through the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers.  Katelin shares her  home with her lab/shepherd, Turbo, and bully breed mix, Denver.

Kate Wilson 

Kate Wilson
Kate Wilson

Kate Wilson has a BS from Michigan State University that is focused on applied animal behavior and neurobiology. She has had a lifelong passion of observing and studying animal behavior. Kate is the trainer at the Creature Conservancy, where she works to improve the lives of exotic animals and provide less stressful vetting and handling. Kate is also the trainer at Cascades Humane Society, where she works to train and enrich the dogs that come to the shelter and provide enrichment for them. Previously she worked as an educator in math and zoology, and has traveled around the world observing animals in their natural environments.

Jane Wolff

Jane Wolff
Jane Wolff

Jane Wolff’s background is in Sociology from the University of Michigan.  She has had dogs all of her life and started educating herself and working with them professionally about 3 years ago.  She was a volunteer at Cascades Humane Society doing training and enrichment and is now on staff in Animal Care.  She became a Certified Professional Dog Trainer spring 2016 and is enrolled in the Academy for Dog Trainers.  Her focus and what pushed her into training is rescue and working with dogs and people in need.

 

For more information about the conference, to become an exhibitor or sponsor, or to register, click here.Register Now